SEP 012: Start Selling Teaching Resources With Ashleigh Smith of Rainbow Sky Creations

Ashleigh is one of the driving forces of Rainbow Sky Creations, an Australian based store that sells teaching resources. Ashleigh gives a step-by-step rundown of what you need to do in order to sell teaching resources online.

Ashleigh (and her partner Alisha) are the duo behind the educational resource centre, Rainbow Sky Creations. Their journey began in Dubai, UAE where they met whilst teaching in an international school.

Since then they have returned to Australia, and are selling their teaching resources, along with managing a successful blog and social media presence.

Their curriculum aligned resources are designed to save teachers time and energy while still providing their students with the best possible learning experiences. Their philosophy is to keep it simple, creative and reduce, reuse, recycle whenever you can.

Ashleigh drops a lot of value in regards if you want to start selling teaching resources online, or even just learn a thing or two from one of the best, as she discussed would do if she was to start again. We also talk blogging, as teacher blogs are one of the biggest opportunities in the online space.

Download the toolkit (which includes many of the tools mentioned in the podcast) here.

Related content

Episode 8 with Michael from The Wheel

Teachers Pay Teachers Australia

15 Tips for selling on Teachers Pay Teachers

4 Steps to Diversify your income

Where you can find Rainbow Sky Creations

0:00
I’ve been teaching for 11 years now. I’m currently on maternity leave for the second time. But I’ve had a bit of a journey in education. I always wanted to be a teacher since I was a little girl. And both my parents actually teachers by trade, too.

0:15
So when I grew up, and I left school, I, I knew that that’s exactly what I wanted to do. So I went into to uni, and I did my degree. And then I came out as a targeted teacher. I don’t know if you have that you’re in Melbourne, aren’t you?

0:27
Yeah. Yeah. close to it.

0:29
Yeah. So I’m from Sydney. So basically, what happened was, I got given a full time permanent position in a school in a Catholic school that was mine to keep every five one today. So that was pretty cool. And actually got a little money bonus as well for taking the job and accepting it. So that was really cool. And so so I worked at that first school for a few years, and I absolutely loved it. It was one of those schools that had a mix of younger and older teachers. And I was really close with the younger teachers, and we just had an hour absolute bull. But one of the things I really wanted to do was go and teach overseas. So I eventually got the courage to ask for some lady from that job. Because it was a permanent job, I was able to take leave without pay. And I went over and taught in an international school in Dubai. And I guess that’s where my tape tape journey kind of begins. Because when I was over there, I met lots of wonderful people. And one of the people I met with my business partner now, her name is Alicia. She lives over in Perth, and who we didn’t actually have anything to do with tape up while we’re over there. We were just friends. But I moved back here. And then eventually she moved back to Sydney for a short time to be with her husband. And she was starting to dabble on TV, he was actually creating click heart and she didn’t have a job at that time, she was looking for a teaching job back here in Sydney. So and I had just had my first baby. So she said to me, come on, why don’t you jump on board and see if you can start creating some resources, we the clip that I’m creating. And I had just come out of leadership before I had my first baby. So one of my roles was really to implement the new Australian curriculum that was being rolled out. So I had a really good idea of what outcomes and when needed to really be focused on and had a good idea of how that the curriculum was being rolled out. So we only had English and Maths at that time. Um, so I will be reluctant at first having a new birth, but I kind of got on board and started tinkering around and playing around with it. And then I just fell in love with it. I fell in love with being able to be creative. And I fell in love with the fact that I was able to still keep in touch with my teaching, which I’m which really is my passion while I wasn’t in the classroom. And it wasn’t by any means a profitable business to start with. It was really something that’s built up over a period of time, but it was it really enjoyable to start with. And that’s coming of how we got started. So Alicia since has moved over to who because that’s where she’s originally from. And we still run the business together, she creates clip hat and some resources, but she’s teaching full time and I this year I work three days a fortnight on the business, but I don’t have my children with me and the rest of the time I’m alone.

3:19
Oh, wow. Really cool. So yeah, yeah, that’s that’s such a good little backstory. And so just for those listening at home, when you mentioned ti PT, you’re talking about like, Teachers Pay Teachers, which is probably the biggest teachers resource marketplace like out there at the moment. There’s a few others like the wheel and whatnot as well. But tape ha is you know, the big kahuna of the mall How did you did you have a business background or anything like that, I know your business partner sort of got you into it. But do you have much of a bit of a background in business or just completely left field

3:51
I have no background a BS this insane that though my parents are both teachers. So my dad runs a tutoring business. And I think lot of work with him throughout my my teaching is too so I’d go to school, and then I’d go do some tutoring for him after. So I had a bit of an ID of the fact that I enjoyed doing other things than just teaching in the classroom. And an idea that maybe your education degree can get you other places than just teaching. Um, but no, I didn’t have any, any experience in marketing, or anything else that goes along with the business world. So we’ve been really letting that on the fly.

4:30
Yeah, that’s awesome. And that’s, that’s such a good way to do it. And that’s basically what we preach here is going out there and solving new problems and learning new things, which by the sounds of it actually, is something you really had to do with your tip, taste, or, and the blog that you created from that I want to go

4:48
Sorry, no, keep going. I was just gonna say that was, that’s the wonderful one of the wonderful things is that not only are we being able to be creative with our resources, and putting them out there to help other teachers, but also it’s been learning and that’s the best things in life is when you learning new things, and discovering new things and growing yourself.

5:07
Yeah, I completely agree. And I will get a touch on that a little bit more, actually, when we’re learning new things. Because teaching as itself is its own little bubble with compared to the rest of the world. It’s a, it’s a profession that’s changed a lot in regards to the technology we use and the standards of teachers and the expectations of teachers. But when you consider, you know, the freelance marketplace, and the freelance workforce that we’re in now, teaching is its own little cocoon, almost of, of safety, and going in there, and learning all of those new skills would be something that not a lot of teachers are getting the opportunity to do, and how do you think that learning all of these new skills and having this learning curve, how do you think it impacted your classroom teaching

5:54
impact in my classroom teaching in a way that I was able to relate my job to the outside world? Yeah, a little bit more, instead of, as you said, just being in that that bubble of school life, and what all that entails. And just knowing that there’s, there’s other things out there. And I suppose as far as all of the marketing and other things that go along with having an online business, it probably hasn’t impacted hugely However, in saying that, to the resources that are now using my classroom is just so much better than they ever have been. And because I, I create them for my students, but also creating them for other teachers, they just need to be about really high caliber. So instead of things being sort of slapdash, or last minute grab, that it’s really thought out and thought through.

6:51
Yeah, definitely. And that’s something that I think it’s really important, like you said, you’ve been able to relate your job to the outside world, which is something that can be a little bit far and for, you know, teachers that may not have left the education system ever, and even going out there. And, you know, teaching in another country, and traveling like you did is such a good way to say other other points of view and other ways to live and just opening your experiences. So I think that’s awesome. And that’s something that we can all take on board. What I want to have it Yeah, what I want to have a bit of a chat about too, is the blog that you created with rainbow sky creations, which is doing great things at the moment in the blog is really, really impressive. So when did you start? When did you start to write the blog with it with the tip taste? Or when did you include it? Like, what was the thought process behind that?

7:43
Well, thank you for saying, That’s impressive. I’m thinking really hard on it. And it it really is only in its infancy. And with the blog is something that we had put on the back burner for a long time, since we started the business. We wanted to start a blog. But neither of us were really motivated in getting down and writing anything to go on it. So we just kept putting it aside and putting it aside. But this year, we will at the end of last year, we we set it up. So it really is only new. And we’re just trying to share what what both Alicia and I do in the classroom. So helpful tips and tricks and ideas and inspiration and just a place that teachers can go and in particular Ozzy teachers and just get ideas like what can I do for the beast that is relatable to Australia and our curriculum and what other teachers in Australia are doing around these particular topic. So that’s kind of the inspiration behind it.

8:42
And we’re trying to add more and more as, as we go, my aim is to add something once a fortnight. So I try and get some probably two things up a month. This month, we’ve been a little bit slow, but we’re getting there.

8:55
Yeah, cool. And that’s something that you’re able to, you know, advertise your your products with, and just get people sort of into into your business and get people to know you guys, which is such an added little bonus. And I know you guys have a social media presence and things like that as well. But being able to do sort of long form content with blog posts, and just giving people those a little bit of extra, you know, extra love and support those extra little tips, really gets customers and really gets clients and really gets the public just to get to know you guys. So I think that’s really, really impressive and really cool that you’re doing that. And it is it is hard, especially when you’re working and you’re you know you’re a mother and you’ve got to look after your family and how do you manage to juggle the time? How do you manage to create time

9:47
it is a massive juggle, I’ll be honest, I think but I think with any working them no matter whether you go into an office, are you going to the classroom or are you working from home, it is always a juggle, I think working from home and can be tricky in that you sometimes a torn between, like what the kids want, and that you’ve got to get this done on the computer. So I’ve tried to really streamline it this year. So my children are in care three days a fortnight and then those three days, I really focus on my business. So I usually go to a cafe for a few hours on both those days and, and work and get all my creative juices out. And then in the afternoons, I do all of this sort of business, the side of things in the marketing Pinterest writing emails to our subscribers writing blog posts, any of our other sort of loose ends that we need to, to do, or to tie up getting back to customers, because there’s lots of feedback that we get or questions that we get asked. So all of that there’s a lot that sort of goes into it, other than just creating the source resources and putting them online. So that’s what I really focus on on those three days. And then throughout the rest of the week, I sort of dabbled in it where I can, but I, I really try and focus on my kids on those other days. And then my business partner is in a totally different situation to me, she is working full time and she’s married, but she doesn’t have any children. So she works mainly on the weekend. She doesn’t do anything during the week. She just focuses on school and self care after school if she can. And then on the weekend, she’ll sit down for a few hours, and we’ll we’ll chat or she’ll get back to some of the emails that I’ve written. And she’ll do any of her business had a parent as well.

11:34
Yeah. And that’s like, such a big part of it is just finding what works for you. It’s all well and good to say, you know, do everything in the morning before school, you know, early bird catches the worm, or, you know, some people prefer to stay up late and do it at night. And some people prefer to do weekends. But actually, I guess what you’re saying is just find the time that works for you.

11:54
For my kids are in K, I would sit down when they had their day sleep. And I would work for it one or two hours. And when they were asleep, and that’s what worked for me. And then in the in the evenings, I might might have done an hour now I’m too tired and evenings to do an hour. So I leave that. And I think that’s the thing too. If you’re doing a business, a side hustle, you need to still be out to enjoy it. It can’t be a chore. So if you’re finding that you staying up late, and that’s not working for you, then you need to mix it up or same thing in the morning.

12:25
Yeah, I completely agree. And I’m going to use some of your expert knowledge here. And if I’m a teacher, and I want to start a little side hustle. And I want to start selling teaching resources, because as a teacher, it’s it’s got a low barrier of entry. I guess compared to other businesses, it’s using skills that we already have, what would be your Yeah, if you were to start again? What would be your first step? Like? Would you start creating resources straight away? Would you start blogging? What would be your first step? If you were to start again,

13:00
I think I would, I would get a clear ID on what problem I’m going to solve for teachers. So if you wanted to create resources, it’s no point in just putting up any old thing that you’ve used in your classroom, you need to think about how is this going to help somebody else? How is this going to change the life of somebody else and go from there, because really, that’s that’s what business is. Business is changing lives. It’s helping others it’s serving others and and that’s the main goal of our Teachers Pay Teachers business is to really be helping other teachers. So that’s probably where I would start and then start creating resources a wrap, so being whatever problem or whatever area of expertise you have. The other thing I would say is, before you start creating anything, you’ve got to know your content, it’s all well and good sign that anyone can create anything. But as teachers, it’s so important that we’re really professional, that we’re putting really high quality things out into the world that are going to help other people not things that aren’t related to the curriculum or that are incorrect or that have mistakes in them.

14:14
Yeah, I I agree in knowing what problem you’re solving is really something similar to what most business owners that I’ve had on this podcast have spoken about before. And it’s knowing your market and it’s, it’s knowing your customer and knowing what they need. And we always talk about nailing down here and almost everyone I’ve spoken to on this without even sort of leading them into the question they’ve always spoken about how by just solving problems, their businesses organically grown and pivoted and taken on other forums. And I think what you’re talking about is like right in that right in that wheelhouse as well, of just knowing knowing what problem you’re solving. So you would definitely suggest if you were starting to maybe pick one day show you might be for example pool, you know, high school maths or something like that. You wouldn’t want to be a generalist sort of tip a creator

15:07
know when we first started we will more generalist and primaries on a primary school teacher. So primary school teachers are in a way, because you have to teach everything. Yep. But there’s some things that some teachers are better at than others. And one thing that I really learned about myself when I started my business is that I love teaching literacy. It is my favorite time of the day with the children. But my, what I’m good at is creating resources, finance, hands on resources for the math in primary school. And my business partner kept saying to me, she kept saying, Come on, actually use you use your brain to sort of do some math things. And as soon as that we did that, and tapped into what we were really good at, we saw profits. But we also saw teachers coming to us and thanking us and saying, These result is a fantastic, my students loved it, this has really helped me and I can’t wait for the next thing that similar to this. And that’s what makes it all worthwhile.

16:10
Yeah, I completely agree. That’s so cool. And it is knowing what you enjoy doing. But also knowing your skill and knowing, you know, your superpower as well, which is always something that is fun to find out and something that’s fun to take advantage of. And knowing what you’re good at. And that comes with trial and error, I guess as well,

16:28
it does, it does. So you can say that and you can choose your niche to start with. And we started with clip art. And that that hasn’t been the end game for us. And that may happen with other people too. But I think with Teachers Pay Teachers, it is a lot of trial and error. So a lot of trial and error of what works, what doesn’t, what people like, what they don’t have to design things, how to, to go along and market things so that people know that they’re out there. And it is a bit of a learning curve. And if you hear a lot of stories about teachers, especially in the States, and they had overnight successes, and I don’t I don’t know if I really believe in any business that has an overnight success. I think any business that’s successful has had a bit of a slow to get there.

17:17
Yeah, I completely agree. And most, most overnight successes are usually years in the making 100% I wanted, you touched on marketing. And I want I want to go a little bit more into that ti, PT. And a lot of these online marketplaces are quite crowded with the amount of resources and the amount of things for sale. How do you how do you draw people to your specific store,

17:40
it’s really hard because there are a lot of things out there. And for a while there, I felt like I was creating all these wonderful things. And it never got into the hands of any teachers and never got into the in front of the eyes of teachers. And what’s the point in that as well, I was I was giving it to my teacher friends so that they could use it, which was great for them. But it doesn’t make my time worthwhile. So there’s a few avenues that teachers on Teachers Pay Teachers use that are really common. One of them is Pinterest do use Pinterest at all.

18:15
Yes, I’m trying to learn the art of Pinterest. As a

18:21
28 year old single man, I’m going to say it’s not really my wheelhouse. So, but I am learning. It’s, it’s actually really, really interesting. I’m quite enjoying it.

18:30
Yes, again, it’s another world. It’s total feel within itself, I think Pinterest. But I guess it people use Pinterest as a search engine. And teachers use Pinterest as a search engine. And, and I i do that as well. If I’m looking for an ID, or I’m looking for I’m not necessarily a resource that mostly ideas, I go on there and search something and it may lead you to a product. And you may buy it even though you weren’t particularly low for a purchase when you first entered the website. So Pinterest has been really good. And that’s really helped us get our products out there to a much wider audience. And we also are on social media to. So we’ve got a Facebook page and an Instagram and our Instagram surprisingly brings us a lot of traffic to our store. And we have a quite a great following on there of people that are really committed to us, and really engaging conversation with us. So that’s, that’s really great to. And then of course, we’ve got our blog, which is another marketing tool. But that’s more I guess, a place that we want teachers to be able to go and connect with us. And to get tips and ideas and inspiration, not just to go there to read something to buy we want we really want that to be a place where they can go and get help and inspiration.

19:57
Yeah, definitely. And for those teachers that may be who be already on Instagram and have Teachers Pay Teachers account, when you draw a people from your Instagram page to your store, you do that through the link in your bio, or,

20:11
and we do it a few ways. So we had this Wipeout feature in our stories, because you have got over 10,000 followers, you get the swipe up, or I think if you have an authorized account, you can also get that swipe up feature. Now I got an email about it the other day. So all you have to do is actually just go in and ask to be authorized. So they often will say no, but sometimes they do they do say yes, there. Those people that have got like the little blue tick next to their name. Yep. Anyway, that’s a side note. So we, we put it in a swipe up in our stories. And then we’ve also got a

20:48
third party that’s called link in profile. Yeah. And what that does is that we’re able to, to add a link to any photo that is actually related to a product. And when you click the linking out by it kind of leaves another Instagram page, and then you can just click on that whatever folder you’re interested in. And that will take you off to there.

21:08
I say. So that’s, that’s cool. That’s a nice little tip that because I know

21:14
one of the it’s I guess it’s I was gonna say it’s one of the barriers, but it’s also one of the joys of Instagram is the fact that you can’t put a link in every single post like you can with Facebook and sort of spread anything. So you having those little

21:27
area and a joy, I agree to you. But at the same time, once you get a good following, and people that are really interested in your products, you might get people asking from a like a year ago about the link to something. And sometimes that’s so hard to keep up with. Yeah, yep. Questions and saying, what what link is ease and you can’t directly give it to them in the comments, you have to do that. Damn it. So it has really saved us time in being able to have this third party. We’ve tried a lot about the ones this one that’s actually free called link tree. Yeah. And if you click on the link in your bio, it’ll just load up and like some little taps. And you can put in some links there, too. So you might have five different tabs one to your blog, once you website one to wherever, and people can click on those tools. We use that for a while. And that was really good, too.

22:17
Yeah, I’ve started with that really recently, actually, actually. And it’s going quite well. It’s one of those things where if you do have a few links, that you kind of just make that link to a bit of a hub for everything. So I’ve got a link to my blog. And I’ve been a link to this podcast and a link to everything else. So it’s cool just to have that in one place. I want to touch a little bit more on Pinterest, because you’ve spoken about that and how that’s been driving in traffic. And it is its own little world and the fact that it’s kind of blurs the line between social media and a search engine. So how do you how do you use Pinterest to your advantage? And what are some tips and tricks that someone like me that has no idea can use?

22:58
Well, I guess we take all that images that we may use on our blog or social media or within our products. And then we turn them into pins and we turn them into pins that are two by three. So they’re a little bit taller than they are longer and they’ve got words on them that eye catching and I usually use a bold font so that they are very clear and easy to read. I don’t try to stay away from sort of curly funds. You know that and it’s really popular at the moment all of those Kersey funds, I’m not good for Pinterest, because people are really usually searching on their phone. So they’re looking at much smaller images than what maybe you’re looking at on your computer. So we create all of our pins, and then we pin them. And we have a third party

23:47
app for that as well called tailwind. Do you have you heard of tailoring?

23:51
Yeah, I used to. And it’s an absolute lifesaver.

23:54
Yeah. So that’s really great. So you can you can do lots of pinning of your content well in advance, which is fantastic for me. So I sit down, and I usually do it in bulk. And then it sort of just beats about through all across all the different boards as you go. So that’s been really good. And that that’s got lots of helpful little things in there to that saves a lot of time. But basically, and I don’t know if I’m really worthy of giving tips. Because I’m no Pro with Pinterest. I’ll be honest,

24:27
creating creating your own pins that a tool rather than longer, we would I catching font. That’s not too much words. And then the other thing with Pinterest is because it is a search engine, you’ve got to really create great detailed descriptions on Europeans. And although that is very annoying, and it’s just another chore, it is really worthwhile. Because if you’re using the good keywords that people are searching, when they’re looking for particular products that you’re pinning your pins going to show up. But if you’re not, if you’re not doing any description, or just putting in a link or keeping it very, very simple, you can may not be showing up,

25:17
right, that’s really interesting. So make sure you’re putting keywords in your descriptions as well. That’s something that I probably need to focus a little bit more on. So that’s, that’s, that’s helpful for me.

25:27
Yeah, I mean, when we do the big overhaul on our Pinterest this year, and we created this huge spreadsheet. So it’s got the link to like, whatever the product is the link to the product. And then our pin description. And what we were doing is using the same pin description, even though even if the pins were different. But we’ve even discovered that we should be mixing up happening descriptions, too, because people could be searching slightly different things,

25:51
right? That’s really cool. And I was I was actually chatting to somebody that Pinterest the other day, and they were telling me to make so for the one article, or the one blog post, or the one basically the one pin to create, like, so I think they created I think it was four different images or five for the same thing. And that would just have it on repeat for the week. So that would be like a whole month’s worth of pins for that one thing rather than repeating the same article all the time now saying that that was working for engagement as well. So I guess that’s one of the things when it comes to social media. And when it comes to search engines is just keeping on top of the little algorithm tweaks and the little changes that get made,

26:35
it could be a full time job in itself. But like you said, If you keep to the fundamentals like you were doing and make sure you know, you’re using fonts, that’s easy to read, and making sure that you, you know, making capturing images you can really draw people in, and if it’s bringing in and the amount of people that it can bring in Pinterest, it’s it’s a massive asset to a business, especially something for teachers were like you said, so many teachers are using Pinterest as a search engine for ideas.

27:06
They definitely are. And that’s that’s something that if you are a business owner and your target audience is teachers, then you need to be looking where are they going for their inspiration? Are they going to countries? Are they just googling things? I think sometimes, yes, sometimes No, sometimes they are going to Pinterest, or I think even now people are going to Instagram or Facebook groups that they’re a part of, to get inspiration.

27:33
Yeah. And that goes back to what you were saying before. It’s just knowing your market. And knowing your audience and being where they are like for some businesses, you know, having a massive LinkedIn presence is, you know, useful and worth its weight in gold. But if you’re, you know, selling teaching resources, that might not be where the teachers are, you know, socializing and hanging out. So you might want to be focusing more on on Pinterest and more on Instagram. And I guess it comes down to knowing your audience. And knowing that you don’t have to do everything like you don’t need to be in control of every single social media platform, you may only have one or two but make sure they wanted to, that your audience are going to resonate with

28:14
definitely make sure that there’s one or two ones that you learn inside out and that you’re good at. There’s no point in being on Instagram, for example, if you think I can’t create images that people want to look at, because that’s what Instagram is, it’s it’s imagery. Whereas if you’re more of a writer, maybe a blocks for you.

28:36
Yeah, I completely agree. And knowing that you only need one or two ways to market. And once you nail those, you can sort of start to expand. But I know so many business owners, because there are so many options out there actually, in so many ways to do it. They try and do sort of everything at once. And, you know, they might be working by themselves and running their own business. And, you know, straightaway, they’ve started a Facebook page and an Instagram account, and a Pinterest that a blog and, you know, there’s five or six different things to keep on top of, and it’s, it’s impossible to do that.

29:12
So how do you get good content out if you’re always focusing on all these other things, too?

29:17
Yeah, exactly. And you, if you try and be everything to everybody, you’re eventually going to become like, nothing, you’re gonna fail. So like, I yeah, it’s, it’s an easy trap to get into. Because there are so many options. And they all work like, they all work in their own way. But they don’t all work if you do them all at the same time.

29:40
Yeah, especially if you are by yourself. Because it’s, you say, the people who are in charge of everything, and like they’re in control of that gut, you know, massive presence on all of the platforms. And you can almost guarantee that that person individually isn’t sitting there and doing everything by themselves. Like, they have people that are doing that for them. And,

30:00
you know, really expensive tools that are scheduling things and, you know, virtual assistants that are doing the scheduling and it’s impossible to expect one person to create teaching resources, you know, work, have a family and be in control of, you know, six or seven social media or, you know, marketing platforms,

30:22
100% I couldn’t, could not agree more, you just better off to choose one that master it. And then you can move on and, and slowly add to it. And I heard that advice a lot as I was, as we were starting off happy stuff.

30:36
And at first I just wanted to get anything do it all. But it has really proved that the slowly go and the more you just focus on one thing, the better IDs

30:46
That’s it? And um, yes, slow is smooth and smooth is fast. I guess

30:52
when it comes down. If you would have if you let’s go back to the person who’s starting again, if you are going to start again, and you’re going to pick one social platform, would you be going with Instagram or Pinterest account, they seem to be the two that are getting the most traction, what would you master first,

31:09
I chose to master Instagram. But I think that Pinterest will probably be a smarter business decision. Because I think that you would be getting your content out to more people quicker than trying to build a following that following that you don’t particularly own. The other thing that I would really focus on doing. If I have starting again, was collecting email addresses for your own email newsletter from the very beginning, even if you weren’t going to be sending anything out just yet, or you weren’t sure how you were going to go about that, I would still start collecting them.

31:49
Yeah, 100%. And it’s so handy to have a list of people that are interested in your business and having those emails, it’s easy to get them from the start. And even if you have something up there. And you know, you don’t get many subscribers at the start. That’s, that’s fine. But as long as you have something there, and you can capture that lead information, no matter what business you’re in, they say on average only, especially online only, I think it’s 2% of visitors to our website are ready to buy right then. And you’ve got to cater to that 98% that aren’t ready at that moment. And especially with tape at I know you you know the platform a lot more than I do. But you can’t access your email, like by emails from Teachers Pay Teachers can you

32:37
know, I don’t think so.

32:39
Yeah, so you’ve got to be sort of doing that on your blog. And you’ve got to be doing that in your own way. And you’ve got to be capturing that lead information. So you can you can send them things and you’ve got people that are already interested in your brand. So are you sending out weekly newsletters? How are you keeping in touch with your email list,

32:56
we wouldn’t send out late play because that’s to you. Because movement and we don’t want to make a commitment and then not be able to pull it through with that. Yeah, so same similar to our blog, we try and we try and send something out every sort of fortnight to month and that’s probably not enough at the stage, I know that they say that you should be appearing in people’s in boxes at least once a week for them to remember you, I want to open up your emails. Um, but at the same time, we don’t want to send things that people don’t want to read either. So we we usually sending out freebies, and then links to our latest products that we know that that particular cohort of people will be interested in,

33:36
that’s it, and you want to be you want to be consistent, I think consistency is a lot more important than frequency, I would much rather, you know, keep to something that you can make sure that you can do, and you can keep up with don’t start doing it, you know, once a week, if you do it for two months. And then you’re you’re basically running out of content, and you’ve got to have something to send them as well. And I don’t know, like, they they say that you should be sending things like, you know, once or twice a week even. And I’m law it’s it’s a lot

34:07
and there’s you can get the traction as well from the start with only doing it, you know, once every fortnight or, you know, a couple of times a month, as long as you’re consistent. I think that’s so much more important.

34:19
Yeah. And if you don’t have the right if you don’t have good content to be sending out twice a week, people can fall off you’re going to get unsubscribe, is because they’re going to open it up and go, Oh, this isn’t like this isn’t what I thought I signed up for. Or I’m not interested in nice or this is just rubbish. This is just repeated. So and people they’re smart. They they don’t want their inbox filled with things they don’t want.

34:43
Yeah, and I’m sure we’ve all signed up to that email list before and we’re getting you know, five or six emails It feels like a day and they’re all repetitive and they’re all trying to sell you something straight away and they’re all you know, not enjoyable to read. And you don’t want to be that person I would buy rather is I’d much rather be sending quality content you know, even once a month then you know bombarding people with things they don’t want to read. Okay. Yeah, that’s that’s a good I think that’s something and that’s that’s a lesson or a couple lessons in there that so many people who either want to start out selling teaching resources or I’ve already started and continue to optimize and just focus on one thing at a time, which is really, really important. So Ashley, thank you for joining me. This has been really, really, really enlightening for me. And I know all the listeners out here are going to learn a lot as well. Where can the listeners where can they find you and find your products,

35:42
we are rainbow sky creations. And we’re rainbow sky creations on every platform. So our blog is www dot rainbow side creations. com and on Instagram, where rainbow flag creations on Facebook. And same on Teachers Pay Teachers. And if you’re a teacher who’s out there who wants to start take 2am creating resources or is interested in any other tips or tricks or just wants to say hello, we’d be more than happy to give us a shout out or give us drop us an email. We’d love to hear from you.

36:14
That’s awesome. Thank you and I will put that in the show notes to everyone listening can access that easily. Ashley again. Thank you so much.

36:22
Thanks means the same. Really fun. Awesome Thank you. Bye. See you.

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